Seasonal 101

winter 01

Winter 101

Truth be told, I prefer grilling in the winter! That’s when I really crave grilled meats and roasted vegetables. And there is no better tool to cook these foods than an outdoor grill. In the wintertime, indirect heat is your best friend. And almost everything that I grill in the winter is cooked by this method. Indirect heat means that there are not briquettes or lit burners under the food and the food is cooked by convected heat—heat that rotates around the food—just like a convection oven.

Here’s a basic tutorial to remind you of the finer points of direct, indirect and the combo cooking methods.  If it takes 20 minutes or less to cook, use direct heat. If it takes more than 20 minutes to cook, use indirect heat.

That said, the more experienced the griller, the more often they will use what I call the Combo method; searing over direct heat and finishing the grilling over indirect heat. It is the way most restaurant chefs prepare meat and my favorite way to grill steaks, chops and pieces of meat that benefit from the eye appeal of great grill marks (searing) and the gentler cooking of indirect heat.

                                                                                                                        

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     You've just bought a shiny new grill or you’ve taken your grill out of winter hibernation, and you can't wait to cookout!  But wait…

Before you grill those steaks, burgers and garden fresh veggies—you’ll want to season your grill.

     Barbecue grills are like cast-iron skillets, they get better and more seasoned, the more you use them. When food cooks on the grill, the fats and juices are vaporized by the heating element and create the smoke that flavors the food with that legendary grilled taste. The smoke accumulates on the inside of the grill and is "seasoned," making your food "sing" with grilled flavor. 

     And, if you’ve had your grill for awhile and use it  a lot, you may notice that the lid of the grill looks like the “paint” is peeling.  This is simply the accumulation of layers of smoke and not paint at all.  Warm soapy water, a scrubbie and a little elbow grease will take the excess off quick and easy.

Be sure to rinse with cool clean water and you are ready to re-season your grill.

     My favorite and most effective way to season your new grill or a grill that has just been cleaned is to fill the cooking grate with uncooked link sausages – not the bulk breakfast variety.  And, I am including my favorite sausage recipe so that you can season your grill and have a great meal too!

Grill the sausages slowly on a low-medium heat until bubbling hot and very brown.  Remove the sausages and re-set the burners to high, letting the grill burn off the residue until it turns white, or about for 20-30 minutes. Do this while you enjoy the Smoked Sausage with Apple Fennel “Sauerkraut When you are done eating, clean the cooking grates with a brass-bristle brush, turn off the gas or close all the vents on a charcoal grill to extinguish the coals—and you are ready for the season! 

 

Follow my tips for Cleaning the Grill and Grill Safety all summer long.

 

Smoked Sausage with Apple Fennel “Sauerkraut”

 

Grilling Method:  Indirect/Medium-low Heat

 

Mock Sauerkraut:

1          large fennel bulb

1          tablespoons olive oil

1          Large Vidalia onion, chopped

5          Granny Smith apples, grated

½         lemon, juiced

1½       tablespoons butter

2          teaspoons caraway seeds

½         cup hard cider or apple juice

            Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

 

8          uncooked sausages, such as Bratwurst, Italian, etc

2          tablespoons butter, melted

8          poppy-seed hot dog buns or French rolls

            Spicy brown or Dijon mustard

 

Clean and cut the fennel bulb in long strips (julienne) and trim tops. Reserve furry leafy part that resembles dill and chop finely for later use.   Heat oil in heavy-bottomed sauce pan over medium heat, add onion and kosher salt.  Cook until onion begins to brown, add strips of fennel, stir, and let cook covered for about 5 minutes or until fennel begins to wilt. Reduce heat to medium-low. 

 

Preheat the grill.  Meanwhile, mix grated apple with lemon juice and add to pan. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, for 15 minutes.  Add butter, mixing well.  Add caraway seeds, reserved fennel tops and hard cider or apple juice.  Cook for an additional 5 minutes, uncovered.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Remove from heat and let sit to allow the flavors to mingle.  The sauerkraut can be made up to 2 days in advance and kept covered in the refrigerator until ready to use.

 

Just before serving, warm sauerkraut, grill sausages and toast buns. 

 

To grill sausages, place them on the cooking grate directly over medium-low heat for 20-25 minutes, turning occasionally until they are cooked through, bubbling and browned on all sides of the sausage .

 

Meanwhile, split the buns and brush a little butter on the inside.  Toast until lightly browned by placing cut side down directly on the cooking grates for 2-3 minutes or until marked.  When ready to serve, place one sausage and a generous amount of the sauerkraut on the bun and serve with mustard on the side.  Serve immediately.

 

Serves 8 

 

Summertime and the living is Outdoors!

My-oh-my, how I love cooking and eating outside. It is as close to a vacation as you can take without leaving your backyard or balcony!

This is the time of year to cook the freshest available fish and meats, fruits and vegetables. And this time of year, I use the Grilling Trilogy more than any other time of the year. I love going to the farmer's market and buying whatever appeals to me—even if I've never tried it before—and taking it home to grill. If you know the difference between direct and indirect grilling and how to use it, all you need to make great tasting food is olive oil, salt and pepper—my trademarked Grilling Trilogy!

Here's a basic tutorial to remind you of the finer points of direct, indirect and the combo cooking methods.

  1. If it takes 20 minutes or less to cook, use direct heat. If it takes more than 20 minutes to cook, use indirect heat.
  2. If you don't know how long your food will take to cook, I have another rule of thumb. The larger the food, the heavier the food, the denser the food, the longer it will take to cook and you need the indirect method. The smaller, the lighter, the more delicate the food, the less time it will take to grill the food and thus the direct method.
  3. When you grill by the indirect method, you don't need to turn the food. When you grill by the direct method, you turn the food, once halfway through the cooking time. If you've never grilled before, using the direct method is an easy way to grill steaks (link to Steak 101), chops or smaller pieces of meat, turning once halfway through the grilling time to cook evenly and get grill marks on both sides of the food.
  4. That said, the more experienced the griller, the more often they will use what I call the Combo method; searing over direct heat and finishing the grilling over indirect heat. It is the way most restaurant chefs prepare meat and my favorite way to grill steaks (link to Steak 2.0), chops and pieces of meat that benefit from the eye appeal of great grill marks (searing) and the gentler cooking of indirect heat.

In the summer, I generally choose a combination of land and sea to go along with fresh vegetables, berries and anything else I find that is ripe and ready.

The major exception is tomatoes. I LOVE summer tomatoes and generally eat those raw, sliced with salt and pepper or my favorite! An over-the-sink tomato sandwich with real Hellmann's mayo and Pepperidge Farm white bread!

Get Grilling! and try this menu, it's one of my favorite meals! [link to recipes in recipe section…

 



White Peach Sangria

 

1 liter Sauvignon Blanc
1 lemon, thinly sliced
3 tablespoons honey
3 peaches, fresh and ripe, sliced into thin wedges
4-5 sprigs of mint

Mix the wine and lemon slices with the honey until dissolved.  Add the peaches and mint. 

Makes 1 ½ quarts.

 



Grilled Antipasto Platter with Mezzo Soprano Sauce

Grilling Method: Direct/Medium Heat

Soprano Sauce:

6 anchovy fillets, drained and finely minced
4 cloves garlic, finely minced
1 tablespoon capers, drained and coarsely chopped
2/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
See Salt, to taste

To make the Soprano Sauce:  Combine the anchovies, garlic and capers in a small bowl or a food processor.  Slowly whisk in the olive oil and season further with salt if desired.  Set aside.

½ cup olive oil
2 teaspoons kosher salt
2 small sweet potatoes, peeled and each cut into 4 long slices
4 medium zucchini, each cut into 4 long slices
2 small radicchio, cut into quarters
1 medium eggplant, cut into 4 long slices; then each slice cut in half widthwise
3 small bunches green onions, trimmed
1 pint small, ripe cherry tomatoes, tossed in a bowl with a little oil
1 lemon, cut into wedges
Kosher salt

Lightly coat cut vegetables with oil.  Sprinkle with salt.

One by one lay the vegetable slices and green onions on the cooking grate over Direct/Medium heat.  (Do this in batches if necessary so the grill is not crowded.)  Cook about 5 minutes.  Turn the vegetables over and baste with the vinaigrette.  Cook 3 or 4 minutes longer. As soon as vegetables are done, remove from grill and transfer to a platter: the zucchini, radicchio and green onions should be done first; the eggplant will take a little longer and the sweet potatoes will be the last to cook through.  While the vegetables are warm, coat with Soprano Sauce.  Let cool to room temperature and coat again if necessary.

When all the other vegetables are done, place the tomatoes onto the cooking grate to mark and warm through, about 2 minutes.  Coat with Soprano Sauce and place onto the platter with the other vegetables, if desired. Decorate with lemon wedges and serve at room temperature.

Serves 6-8



Salt Crusted Shrimp with Potent Lemon-Garlic Dipping Sauce

Grilling Method: Direct/Medium Heat

Dipping Sauce:

½ cup best-quality extra-virgin olive oil
Juice from 1 large lemon
Zest from ½ lemon
2 cloves garlic, minced
4 stems fresh oregano
Freshly ground pepper to taste

Shrimp:

16 Jumbo or Collosal shrimp in the shell (or frozen black tiger shrimp)
3 tablespoons olive oil
¼ cup Kosher salt

Make the Dipping Sauce:
Whisk together the oil and lemon. Stir in the garlic. Take the leaves off the oregano stems and leave whole, add to oil mixture. Let sit for at least 20 to 30 minutes to marry the flavors—or make up to 12 hours in advance. Set aside.

If desired, devein the shrimp with a “shrimp deveiner” or, using a small sharp knife, make a slit about ¼-inch deep down the backs of the shrimp and remove the vein but do not remove the shells. Place the shrimp in a large bowl and toss with the olive oil to coat lightly all over. Just before putting on the grill, sprinkle the salt evenly over the shrimp and toss well to make sure each shrimp is thoroughly coated in a crust of salt.

Place the shrimp in the center of the cooking grate, 3 to 4 minutes per side or until the shrimp is pink and the flesh is opaque (white). Serve immediately with dipping sauce.

Serving Tip: This is my favorite party “ice breaker” appetizer. I place the oil-tossed shrimp in a bowl on a tray with a small bowl of the kosher salt, my tongs, lots of napkins, a platter and the prepared dipping sauce. Once everyone is armed with a cocktail, we hit the deck to start the party. While we are talking, I toss the shrimp in the salt, grill them and place them on the platter. Then the fun begins, everyone takes a shrimp, peels and dips it in the sauce for a fun, casual and interactive appetizer! By the time the shrimp, and our cocktails are gone we are either fast friends or better friends! Alternatively, you can arrange 4 shrimp on each serving plate and accompany with a small ramekin of the dipping sauce but the girls think serving them hot off the grill is sooo much more fun!

Serves 4

© 2002 Girls at the Grill™

 



Steak 2.0

This method is for the backyard griller who knows the difference between direct and indirect heat and when to use it and has discovered that indirect heat is the secret to great grilling!  This is my preferred method of cooking a steak or chop.

 

Grilling Method:  Combo

4 New York strip steaks or other favorite steak, about 1 ½ inches thick
1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Olive oil
2 tablespoons of butter, optional
Chopped Parsley, optional

Allow meat to come to room temperature about 20 to 30 minutes before grilling. 
Just before grilling, brush both sides of the steaks with the oil and season with salt and pepper.

Place steaks directly over direct high heat (about 500 F) for about 5 minutes. Turn steak and continue cooking for about 5 more minutes for medium rare.  Remove the steaks from the grill and top the steaks with ½ tablespoon butter and parsley on top, if desired.  Allow to rest 5-10 minutes before serving.

Serves 4

 



Grilled Hearts of Romaine with Blue Cheese Dressing

 

Grilling Method: Indirect/Medium Low Heat

2 hearts of romaine lettuce, cut in half lengthwise
Olive oil
Kosher salt
Freshly ground pepper
Blue Cheese Dressing (below)
4 Slices of Apple-wood smoked bacon, cooked and crumbled

Blue Cheese Dressing:

1 cup mayonnaise
½ cup sour cream
4-8 ounces crumbled blue cheese, depending on taste
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1 ½ tablespoons grated shallot
2 cloves garlic, grated
Kosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

Combine the above ingredients and refrigerate for at least three hours, (this lets the flavors develop.)  This recipe will make 2 cups.

Lightly brush lettuce all over, taking care not to break the leaves.  Sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Using a pair of tongs, place the lettuce directly on the cooking grates cut side down for 2-3 minutes.  Do not grill longer, the lettuce should be slightly crisp.  Remove to a clean platter and let sit 5 minutes.

 Place half a heart of romaine on each plate, drizzle with blue cheese dressing and sprinkle with bacon bits.  Serve immediately.

Serves 4



Four Berry Fruit Cobbler

 

Grilling Method: Indirect/Medium Low Heat

1 pint strawberries, halved
1 pint blueberries
1 pint blackberries
1 pint raspberries
Juice of 1 orange
Zest of 1 orange
Juice of 1 lemon
Zest of 1/4 lemon
2 tablespoons Grand Marnier, optional
¼ cup sugar
5 tablespoons cornstarch
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Topping:

¼ cup butter, softened
¼ cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 cup flour

In a large bowl, combine strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and raspberries, add orange juice, orange zest, lemon juice, lemon zest and optional Grand Marnier, sugar, cornstarch and cinnamon; mix lightly. Let set for 5 minutes. Meanwhile make streusel topping. In a medium bowl combine butter, sugar and cinnamon, mix well with a fork. Add flour and mix until crumbly.

Place berry mixture into a souffle dish. Top with streusel topping. Place in center of cooking grate. Cook 40 minutes or until brown and bubbly.

Note: may be made in individual souffle dishes, cooking time is 15 to 20 minutes. Serve with vanilla ice cream.



Steak 101

This method is for those who don't have a firm grasp of direct and indirect heat and how to use it. This is a simple way to cook a steak and your results should be great from the get-go!

Grilling Method:  Indirect/Medium Heat

4 New York strip steaks or other favorite steak, about 1 ½ inches thick
1 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
Olive oil
2 tablespoons of butter, optional
Chopped Parsley, optional

Allow meat to come to room temperature about 20 to 30 minutes before grilling. 
Just before grilling, brush both sides of the steaks with the oil and season with salt and pepper.

Place steaks directly over Medium-high heat (about 375 F) for about 5 minutes. Turn steak and continue cooking for about 5 more minutes for medium rare.  Remove the steaks from the grill and top the steaks with ½ tablespoon butter and parsley on top, if desired.  Allow to rest 5-10 minutes before serving.

Serves 4

 

Truth be told, I prefer grilling in the winter! That's when I really crave grilled meats and roasted vegetables. And there is no better tool to cook these foods than an outdoor grill. In the wintertime, indirect heat is your best friend. And almost everything that I grill in the winter is cooked by this method. Indirect heat means that there are not briquettes or lit burners under the food and the food is cooked by convected heat—heat that rotates around the food—just like a convection oven.

Here's a basic tutorial to remind you of the finer points of direct, indirect and the combo cooking methods.

If it takes 20 minutes or less to cook, use direct heat. If it takes more than 20 minutes to cook, use indirect heat.

That said, the more experienced the griller, the more often they will use what I call the Combo method; searing over direct heat and finishing the grilling over indirect heat.  It is the way most restaurant chefs prepare meat and my favorite way to grill steaks, chops and pieces of meat that benefit from the eye appeal of great grill marks (searing) and the gentler cooking of indirect heat. 

In the winter, however, I generally choose hard squashthat take an hour or more to cook and roasts, whole birds and larger pieces of food so that I can preheat the grill, set the burners on indirect heat and let the food cook with very little tending.  And, remember, indirect grilling has to be done with the lid down and very little peeking!

Try this menu, it's one of my favorite winter meals!

 



Winter Quesadillas with Smoked Salmon and Caviar

These indulgent quesadillas were created by my friend, Sarah Leah Chase. They add a colorful, easy elegance to winter meals. They may be grilled directly on the cooking grate or wrapped in foil and warmed over the grill

Grilling Method: Direct/Medium Heat

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
3 scallions, trimmed and minced
3 ounces thinly sliced smoked salmon, minced
3 tablespoons minced fresh dill
½ cup shredded Monterey Jack cheese
Freshly ground pepper to taste
6 eight-inch green, flour tortillas
6 eight-inch red, flour, tortillas
Olive oil for brushing, if grilling directly over fire
½ cup sour cream
2 ounces salmon or other favorite caviar

Place cream cheese, scallions, salmon, dill and Monterey Jack in a mixing bowl.  Mash together with a fork until thoroughly blended.  Season with pepper.

Lay the green tortillas out on large work surface and spread each with a generous layer of the cream-cheese-salmon mixture.  Top with the red tortillas, pressing gently to make them adhere.

Preheat grill to medium-high heat.  If grilling quesadillas directly on cooking grate, brush both red and green sides lightly with olive oil and place on the cooking grate.  Grill each side until lightly browned and blistered, about 2 minutes per side.  Otherwise, wrap the quesadillas individually in foil and place on the cooking grate until warmed through, about 5 minutes.  Cut each quesadillas into 8 wedges and garnish with a ½ teaspoon dollop of sour cream and a few caviar eggs.  Serve at once.

Makes 24 hours d'oeuvres.

 



Apple Cider-Brined Roasted Pork Loin with Root-Vegetable Puree

Apple Cider Brine:

4 cups apple cider
1/3 cup kosher salt
1/3 cup sugar 
2 bay leaves, crumbled
1 teaspoon black peppercorns
1teaspoon whole cloves
2 cups cold water

Combine the cider, salt, sugar, bay leaves, peppercorns and cloves in a large stockpot. Bring to a boil over medium high heat and cook for about three minutes, stirring occasionally, or until the sugar and salt dissolve. Remove from the heat, add the cold water (or ice cubes to cool to room temperature faster). Place the pork loin in a non-reactive pan and cover with the brine. Cover or tightly close the bag and refrigerate for 6-12 hours. If you are using an extra large re-sealable bag, rotate the pork a few times to make sure all of the meat gets brined. Before roasting, remove the pork and pat dry with paper towels.

Grilling Method: Indirect/Medium Heat

1 3-4 pounds pork loin
4 medium onions, peeled
6 large carrots
3 stalks celery
Head of garlic, wrapped in foil
Kosher salt and pepper to taste
¼-½ cup Balsamic vinegar
2-4 tablespoons olive oil

Just before grilling, lightly brush pork with olive oil. Place pork on a roast holder and place in a large drip pan or roasting pan. Meanwhile, coat vegetables with oil and place in pan. Grill for one hour or until an instant-read meat thermometer reaches 155°F. Remove pork from roasting pan. Let meat rest for 10 minutes.  Meanwhile, place vegetables and any pan juices in food processor, add balsamic vinegar and olive oil and puree. Add vinegar and oil as needed to thin out. Adjust seasonings to taste.

Cut pork into thin slices and spread with sauce (sauce will be thick) and serve.

Serves 6-8



Grilled Brusssel Sprouts with Applewood Smoked Bacon and Maple Syrup

Grilling Method: Indirect/Medium Heat

Dipping Sauce:

1 ½ pounds brussel sprouts, trimmed and cleaned

Olive oil
Kosher Salt
8 pieces center-cut applewood smoked bacon, cut into ½ strips
3 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
Freshly ground black pepper

Place clean, dry brussel sprouts in bowl, add about 2 tablespoons of olive oil and toss to coat evenly.  Season with Kosher salt.  Place brussel sprouts directly on the cooking grate and cook for about 20 minutes, turning once halfway through the cooking time.

Meanwhile, cook the bacon reserving 1-2 tablespoons of bacon in the sauté pan.  When brussel sprouts are done, cut in half and set aside.  Re-heat sauté pan with the reserved bacon fat.  Add the maple syrup and vinegar to whisk to combine.  Add brussel sprouts and sauté to coat, making sure the glaze is evenly distributed.  Remove from pan, season with pepper and sprinkle with cooked bacon pieces.

Serves 4-6

 



Forgotten Onion

Grilling Method:  Indirect/Medium Heat

4 Medium onions, preferably Vidalia
Olive oil
Fleur de sel or coarse sea salt

Leaving skins on the onions, rub lightly with olive oil.  Place directly on the cooking grates and grill for 1-2 hours depending on size.  This can be done with any onion, including shallots.  It is not necessary to turn during the cooking time.  Check the onions periodically and remove from grill when you can see the dark onion juices bursting through the skin.

When cool enough to touch, remove skins and serve as an accompaniment to grilled meat or fish. Rose says that onion layers also can be separated and then served as little vegetable cups to hold steamed peas, mashed potatoes or other vegetables.

Serves 4

 



Grilled Apple Upside Down Cake with Crème Fraiche

 

1 stick unsalted butter
¼ cup sugar
4 small Granny Smith apples, peeled, cored and cut into quarters
Juice of half small lemon

2 cups Granny Smith apples, roughly chopped
2 cups sugar
2 eggs
¾ cup Wesson or other vegetable oil
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon
1 ½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon sea salt, plus a pinch for sautéed apples
2 teaspoons vanilla
1 cup black walnuts, lightly toasted
Crème Fraiche for serving (see below)

Preheat grill (Indirect/Medium-Low Heat) or oven to 350ºF.  Heat a 10-inch cast iron skillet, small braiser or other oven-safe pan on the stove. Add butter to the pan and melt.  Add sugar and stir until sugar starts to turn brown, about 3 to 5 minutes.  Be careful not to burn the sugar; it will continue to cook even after you add the apples.  Add a pinch of sea salt and lemon juice.  Stir to combine.  Lower the heat and add quartered apples.  Sauté for about 5 minutes or until caramelized and slightly soft.  Arrange sautéed apples neatly in the bottom of pan or in a 10-inch cake pan.  Let cool to room temperature.

Mix coarse chopped apples with sugar and set aside.  Meanwhile, using a blending fork or whisk, beat eggs with oil just to combine; add vanilla.  Sift flour, cinnamon, baking soda and salt and set aside.  Mix flour into egg mixture a little at a time until all the flour is incorporated and there are no lumps.

Add apple-sugar mixture and their juices. Mix well to evenly distribute apples, sugar and batter.  Add walnuts.  Let sit for 15 minutes to extract juices from the apples.  Mix again to incorporate any apple juices.  The batter will be very thick, almost like cookie dough.  Place batter on top of sautéed apples. (If you have any batter left over bake in muffin cups.) 

Place in the center of the cooking grate and bake at 350º F for 11/2 hours or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean. 

Note:  start testing for doneness after 60-70 minutes since all oven bake slightly different.  This cake takes a full 90 minutes in my oven but takes just over an hour in my mother's oven.  Let cake cool in the pan for 15 minutes and then invert onto a clean cake plate.  Serve warm with crème fraiche (see recipe for homemade version).

 

Homemade Crème Fraiche:

I love making my own crème fraiche and like the taste better than store bought, so I urge you to make it, but be forewarned it takes a couple of days to thicken before you can use it.

2 pints heavy whipping cream
2 tablespoons buttermilk

Pour heavy whipping cream in a clean glass jar with lid.  Add the buttermilk, shake gently and close lid.  Place jar in the warmest part of your house (i.e., on top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 2-3 days until thickened.  When the cream has cultured, use immediately and store in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Serves 8

I love grilling during the Fall!!

Apples and pears and squash!  I also love grilling duck—stuffed with apples and oranges—and grilling a big ole brined turkey for Thanksgiving of course!

During the fall, I seem to crave big pieces of meat and colorful root vegetables.  Since they are big and heavy and dense, they take a longer time to cook meaning that this is the season to perfect your indirect cooking!

 And, if you have any questions, please write me at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Fall Fruit in Foil with Bourbon Whipped Cream

Grilling Method: Indirect/Medium Heat

2 large Honey Crisp or Granny Smith apples, sliced

3 large pears, sliced

½ cup walnut pieces, toasted

½ cup dried cherries

2 teaspoons cinnamon sugar

1 tablespoon cornstarch

¼ cup Grand Marnier or orange juice

4 teaspoons Sugar in the Raw or white sugar

Heavy duty aluminum foil

Combine apple slices, pear slices, nuts and cherries in a large bowl.  Toss with cinnamon sugar and cornstarch.  Add Grand Marnier and toss again.  Let sit for 10 minutes.  Divide mixture and its liquid into four equal portions.  Place each portion into the center of a double sheet of aluminum foil.  Sprinkle top of each portion with a teaspoon of Sugar in the Raw. 

Fold and crimp sides of foil to tightly enclose the fruit mixture.  Place in the center of the cooking grate and grill for 30 minutes or until fruit is soft and the liquid has formed a light sauce.  Serve hot or at room temperature with bourbon whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.


Bourbon Whipped Cream

To make bourbon whipped cream, add 1 tablespoon super-fine sugar and 2 tablespoons bourbon to cream as it is being whipped.  Beat until stiff and serve immediately. Refrigerate any unused cream.

Serves 4

hi elizabeth3
a food fanatic and the Grill Girl from North Carolina who has seasoned, basted and tasted my way across the country. Please join me on my non-stop, culinary journey...


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