Recipe of the Week

Main Ingredient - Vegan
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

This is a favorite of the barbecue circuit and it is one of those recipes that taste much better than it sounds. Even the biggest naysayer can’t keep his hands off the cabbage once it is done. The real trick is to cook it until so tender that you can pluck a leaf from the center without any resistance.

Created by Elizabeth Karmel
Created by Elizabeth Karmel
recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Grilling asparagus miraculously transforms it from the kind of vegetable you hated as a kid to a sweet, meaty, lip-smackin’ treat that you can’t get enough of as an adult. This is the least amount of work you will ever have to do to be considered the Queen of the Grill. Contrary to popular belief, look for the fatter stalks when buying asparagus, they are much better suited to grilling and actually have better flavor.

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

My good friend, Rose Levy Beranbaum is most known for her baking expertise including her most recent tome, The Pie and Pastry Bible. But, in her free time, Rose really loves to grill and she discovered this technique for cooking onions by forgetting it one night and waking up in the middle of the night to discover that instead of being ruined, it was the most savory caramelized onion she had ever eaten. For that reason, it is the "Forgotten Onion." I've taken her idea and changed it a bit to make the world's best grilled onion roasted onion.

Created by Elizabeth Karmel

This is one of the first “unusual” foods that I tried nearly a decade ago. Since then, it has become commonplace for me and hundreds of people that I’ve encouraged to make it. But it is still one of my top-ten all time favorites. Although, they take a while to cook, resist the urge to pre-cook the potatoes. They are sooo much better cooked entirely on the grill.

Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Have a glut of apples? Make homemade applesauce for dinner tonight.

     Each fall, I can’t help myself from buying apples by the bushel. I get so excited by the crisp air and the fresh-from-the-orchard apples that I inevitably buy too many—my eyes are bigger than my stomach. I bake pies and apple cakes and sauté fresh sliced apples for breakfast the way my mother did when I was a child, but my hands-down favorite thing to eat is homemade applesauce.

     I remember my first taste of this applesauce. My mother was making Julia Child’s French Apple Tart—the original recipe that has a bed of well-seasoned applesauce on the bottom and a fan of apricot-jam glazed apples on the top. The brandy-laced applesauce was the best part of the tart for me, and a variation of that recipe is what I use to make lots of applesauce.

     I love the process of peeling the apples, cutting them into rough chunks and placing them in my heavy enameled Dutch oven. I use whatever apples I have on hand—sometimes they are all the same and sometimes they are a mixed bag. I toss the apples with lemon juice, a little sugar and cinnamon to season them and keep them from turning brown. I add lemon zest for zing and salt for balance. I put the lid on the pot and wait patiently while the apples cook and give up their natural juices. In 15-20 minutes, they are ready to mash and give way easily with a fork or a spoon. You could serve the applesauce at this stage but the next step is what makes it exceptional!

     Once the apples are cooked down to a rough mash, I add just enough sweet butter to round out the tart acidity of the apples and a splash of cognac to add a depth of flavor. The mixture is then brought to a boil, and simmers for 5 minutes until all of the raw alcohol is cooked away, leaving just the fabulous flavor. And, that is the secret to the best homemade applesauce you’ve ever tasted!

     It’s old-fashioned and new fangled all at once and every time I serve it with roasted chicken or grilled pork chops, the re-sounding opinion is that “the applesauce was the best part of the meal!”  

     I couldn’t agree more! This recipe can be halved or doubled, easily! What you don’t eat warm, you can refrigerate and eat “leftover” for a week. It is the perfect utilization recipe for all those left over apples from your recent apple-picking adventure, but I also make homemade applesauce when I want to perk up a less-than-exciting meal and impress my dining companions with something unexpectedly delicious!

Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Have a glut of apples? Make homemade applesauce for dinner tonight.

     Each fall, I can’t help myself from buying apples by the bushel. I get so excited by the crisp air and the fresh-from-the-orchard apples that I inevitably buy too many—my eyes are bigger than my stomach. I bake pies and apple cakes and sauté fresh sliced apples for breakfast the way my mother did when I was a child, but my hands-down favorite thing to eat is homemade applesauce.

     I remember my first taste of this applesauce. My mother was making Julia Child’s French Apple Tart—the original recipe that has a bed of well-seasoned applesauce on the bottom and a fan of apricot-jam glazed apples on the top. The brandy-laced applesauce was the best part of the tart for me, and a variation of that recipe is what I use to make lots of applesauce.

     I love the process of peeling the apples, cutting them into rough chunks and placing them in my heavy enameled Dutch oven. I use whatever apples I have on hand—sometimes they are all the same and sometimes they are a mixed bag. I toss the apples with lemon juice, a little sugar and cinnamon to season them and keep them from turning brown. I add lemon zest for zing and salt for balance. I put the lid on the pot and wait patiently while the apples cook and give up their natural juices. In 15-20 minutes, they are ready to mash and give way easily with a fork or a spoon. You could serve the applesauce at this stage but the next step is what makes it exceptional!

     Once the apples are cooked down to a rough mash, I add just enough sweet butter to round out the tart acidity of the apples and a splash of cognac to add a depth of flavor. The mixture is then brought to a boil, and simmers for 5 minutes until all of the raw alcohol is cooked away, leaving just the fabulous flavor. And, that is the secret to the best homemade applesauce you’ve ever tasted!

     It’s old-fashioned and new fangled all at once and every time I serve it with roasted chicken or grilled pork chops, the re-sounding opinion is that “the applesauce was the best part of the meal!”  

     I couldn’t agree more! This recipe can be halved or doubled, easily! What you don’t eat warm, you can refrigerate and eat “leftover” for a week. It is the perfect utilization recipe for all those left over apples from your recent apple-picking adventure, but I also make homemade applesauce when I want to perk up a less-than-exciting meal and impress my dining companions with something unexpectedly delicious!

Created by Elizabeth Karmel
Created by Elizabeth Karmel
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

I think tomatoes are probably the best thing that comes from the earth! I started making these with the cherry or grape tomatoes--that you can find all year long-that still tastes like a tomato! It is the simplest recipe but it is a favorite of nearly everyone I know. I make it at least twice a week and most of my friends are addicted as well-but hey, it's a healthy addiction!

recipe image

hi elizabeth3
a food fanatic and the Grill Girl from North Carolina who has seasoned, basted and tasted my way across the country. Please join me on my non-stop, culinary journey...


follow elizabeth_top

follow elizabeth_emailfollow elizabeth_youtubefollow elizabeth_twitterfollow elizabeth_facebookFollow Me on Pinterest

follow elizabeth_ladybug

SIGN UP for NEWSLETTER JOIN the LADYBUG CLUB 


share our_strength


CastIronNation

Revol-eak banniere

 

great gadget_giveaway

Banner
Banner

ladybug bar