Recipe of the Week

Main Ingredient - New Recipes!
Created by Elizabeth Karmel
recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Original BBQ Sauce

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Kick’N Spicy™ BBQ Sauce

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Teriyaki Marinade Mix

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Lemon Pepper Marinade Mix

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Gourmet Burger Spice Rub

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

There are basically two ways to top popcorn — wet and dry.

Let’s start with wet toppings, such as melted butter. Melted butter is always a crowd pleaser, but you have to make that version just before serving or else it gets soggy. Plus, buttered popcorn is always best hot. Other wet toppings, such as melted chocolate, should be applied to popcorn spread flat on a baking sheet, then allowed to cool. Otherwise it becomes soggy.

The advantage of dry flavor toppings is that you can make the popcorn a few hours in advance, then serve it room at temperature. Just make sure to add the spices while the popcorn is hot. My three favorites are truffle salt, Parmesan cheese and a sweet and spicy barbecue rub.

To cook the popcorn for use with a dry topping, I use a heavy enameled cast-iron Dutch oven set over medium heat. I heat the empty pot for about 2 minutes over low heat, then pour in the olive oil and the popcorn, increase the heat to medium and immediately place the lid on the pot. The heavy pot helps prevent the popcorn from burning and almost all of the kernels pop. I find that a good olive oil gives the popcorn a great flavor and that you won’t even want to add melted butter.

As soon as the popcorn is popped, I pour it out of the pan into the biggest bowl I have. I toss the popcorn with the seasoning and continue to toss so that the steam doesn’t make the popcorn soggy. When the steam dissipates, I toss it a few more times, taste to make sure that I have enough flavoring, then let it come to room temperature in the bowl. At this point you can place it in serving bowls or baskets or even individual paper bags to give your guests.

And don’t forget to pair your gourmet popcorn with a flute of sparkling wine. The make the perfect high-low party combination!

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Casseroles are a funny thing. You aren’t likely to see them lauded as the hot new food trend any time soon. Yet make a great one, and suddenly folks clamor for the recipe.

My favorite casserole is one that typically is served for breakfast or brunch. It’s called an egg strata, and I love it because it’s easy to prep ahead of time, and bakes up light and fluffy, and yet is substantial and satisfying.

The other thing that I love about a strata is that you can tailor it to include your favorite flavors, as well as make it sweet or savory. Strata is the plural of stratum, which literally means layers, and you can layer all your favorite ingredients in with the bread and egg custard.

I grew up with the classic cheddar cheese, breakfast sausage egg strata. When I moved to Chicago, I began to experiment with different fillings. I fell in love with this city’s Greek omelet, which is a signature of its ubiquitous diners. I adapted those flavors to create a spinach, feta, onion and tomato strata. Another favorite is wild mushrooms, leeks and brie cheese.

When I am cooking brunch for a lot of people, I like to make two strata — one sweet, another savory.

There are simpler strata recipes available, but I still love the original I grew up with. It uses more eggs and a mixture of milk and half-and-half for a richer, more quiche-like custard. I don’t use as much bread as many recipes because I like it to literally melt into the other ingredients. This produces a lighter, puffier strata. I do add a bit more bread to my sweet French toast version because I want a breadier result for that version.

Letting the strata rest before baking allows the bread to become saturated by the egg mixture, as well as the other flavors.

I like to let it rest overnight. Not only does this produce the creamiest result, it also saves me any trouble in the morning. I just uncover it and pop it in the oven. But if you prefer to make it the day of, plan to let it rest for at least an hour in the refrigerator.

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Garlic & Herb Marinade Mix

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Much as I love mashed white potatoes, my favourite "potato" is the sweet  variety.

I've been cooking and eating sweet potatoes as long as I can remember. And  when I found out that they were loaded with vitamins and other good-for-you  stuff like fiber, I immediately thought... Here's a great excuse to eat sweet  potato pie!

Kidding aside, sweet potatoes are just as good if not better than traditional  baking potatoes in savory applications. My favourite one-bowl meal in winter is  a loaded baked potato. And I often make it with sweet potatoes.

Around 5 p.m., I throw the potatoes in a 350 F oven. I find that a lower oven  temperature keeps the skin from falling apart, allowing you to split the potato  in half and load it up! However, it does take twice as long for the potatoes to  cook.

This year, I have been topping my potato with sauteed kale, which not only  looks stunning — all that orange and green — but also is a perfect complement to  the sweet "meaty" potato.

But that's not all. I also roast garlic and make it into a paste to flavour  the potato, folding in just a touch of butter and a pinch of sage. I scoop out  half of the potato, mix it all together, add half the cheese and put it back  into the shells like you would a twice-baked potato. At this point, the recipe  can be made in advance and re-heated another day.

Just before serving, you sprinkle on more cheese, add a healthy spoonful of  the sauteed kale and, if you like, top with toasted pumpkin seeds for a welcome  crunch. If you don't like kale, you can saute spinach instead. And while I have  specified fontina and Gruyere for the cheeses, Parmesan, cheddar and mozzarella  are great, too.

I generally make this loaded potato a "meatless meal," but you could easily  add leftover or rotisserie chicken.

recipe image
Created by kirstenpa

My good friend Kirsten makes this recipe with her Mom (irene) every year for Christmas Eve.  Her family has been making this recipe for 5 generations.  Enjoy!

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Original BBQ Marinade Mix

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

There  is just something about roasted chicken that comforts, nourishes and satisfies  like nothing else, especially when the wind is howling and it is cold  outside.

Not  too long ago, I went to visit a friend and when I walked into her house I had to  take a deep breath to savor the aromas coming from the kitchen. I couldn't keep  my stomach from growling; her house smelled divine. Naturally, I had to follow  my nose and take a peek in the oven.

Her  British-born mother was roasting a chicken for Sunday supper. Not such an  unusual occurrence, in and of itself. But when I looked at the chicken, I saw  that the breast was blanketed in bacon, adding to the intoxicating roasting  smells, not to mention a good deal of flavor to both the meat and the  drippings.

I  knew that I had to take this English farmhouse tip home. My friend's mother  brushed off my questions with a roll of the eyes, suggesting this really was the  only way to roast a chicken.

Of  course, I wrap many things in bacon and it has saved many an average meal for  me. But I have never wrapped a whole chicken. The thing that I loved the most  about her technique was that the chicken was decidedly not wrapped; the bacon  was almost haphazardly placed on top of the chicken like a blanket. It was there  to aid in the cooking process, not necessarily be part of the finished dish.

I  decided to add this technique to my recipe for chicken with 40 cloves of garlic  and shallots. I already had added shallots to the traditional 40 cloves recipe  to make the chicken even more fragrant and delicious. The beauty of this recipe  is that the garlic and the shallots cook in the fat that is rendered out as the  chicken — and now bacon — roasts.

This  recipe is one of my winter comfort foods and I always serve it with lots of  fresh crusty bread and sweet butter to spread with the roasted garlic, as well  as a green vegetable — usually a quick saute of baby  spinach

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Hickory Smoked BBQ Sauce

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

Recipe using Buzz’N Honey™ BBQ Sauce

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

One doesn’t consider potatoes when thinking of common pizza toppings. And that’s because this pizza is anything but common. We’ve riffed off the classic French tarte aux pommes de terre to create a pizza that is pure gold.

recipe image
Created by Elizabeth Karmel

One doesn’t consider potatoes when thinking of common pizza toppings. And that’s because this pizza is anything but common. We’ve riffed off the classic French tarte aux pommes de terre to create a pizza that is pure gold.

recipe image

hi elizabeth3
a food fanatic and the Grill Girl from North Carolina who has seasoned, basted and tasted my way across the country. Please join me on my non-stop, culinary journey...


follow elizabeth_top

follow elizabeth_emailfollow elizabeth_youtubefollow elizabeth_twitterfollow elizabeth_facebookFollow Me on Pinterest

follow elizabeth_ladybug

SIGN UP for NEWSLETTER JOIN the LADYBUG CLUB 


share our_strength


CastIronNation

Revol-eak banniere

 

great gadget_giveaway

Banner
Banner

ladybug bar